Tagged: toni wiseman

From Radio to TV

Keeping the daily posts going this week.

In this part of the interview, Toni Marie starts about the differences she found when switching from radio to TV. Also mentions how they are unique when it comes to how the teleprompter works.  People at other stations will be surprised at that one.

But we start off with the day she went in for a job interview with NTV.


TONI: I was quite nervous since didn’t know if I was a television kind of person. Radio as you know is so much freer in many ways.

In many ways you can be more expressive physically than you can on TV. On TV people can see if you talk with your hands a lot. In radio they don’t see that.

One of the first things I had to do was read news on camera. I’d read news but never from a teleprompter. And the teleprompter that day wasn’t working. So, I had to kind of cheat. Where you look down and look up at the same time. Of course I didn’t have any experience in that. So, I thought I had done a terrible job.

But the next day they called and offered me the job. I guess they saw some potential and nearly twenty years later I’m still there.

ROB:    I’ve used the teleprompter a couple of times when I took TV broadcasting at Algonquin College in Ottawa.  Have a few memories of when the teleprompter would break down. And then we’d have to do exactly what you said, read off the script.

TONI:   In many stations they have an auto-cue person. A a tech person who controls the teleprompter for the news anchors. Which means somebody else controls the pace of your reading.

People who have worked at other television stations and come to work for us find our set up very peculiar and aren’t used to it.

At our station we get to control it ourselves. I control the speed myself. And I find it works quite well, because I read a lot faster than most people. I’m not waiting or anticipating when the teleprompter or auto queue is going to move.

Also it gives you something to do with your hands when you’re on television. As I said, you can’t talk with your hands like you do in radio so it gives you something to hold when you’re there. That’s the one thing people say when I interview them is, “What do I do with my hands?”

When you’re anchoring a newscast at our station at least you have that problem solved for you.

ROB:    What was the hardest part of the transition from radio to TV when you started? I guess it’s getting used to people recognizing you on the street instead of by your voice.

TONI:   Well, yes, a lot of that. And also in radio you don’t really have to dress up.

A lot of what I’d done in radio was overnights when there isn’t a lot of management around. They don’t care if you wear blue jeans and a T-shirt. You can’t wear that when you’re on television anchoring the news.

Radio is live and television is live, but they can see terror on your face. You can hide nervousness fairly well on the radio. You can’t on TV.

And it’s all those sorts of things that you don’t really pick up until you see yourself television. “Why do I tilt my head when I ask a question? That looks so foolish.”

I still love radio and a lot of the time I miss it. Radio is more personal in many ways. When people listen to their favorite radio announcer they really feel a warm, fuzzy connection to that voice.

When you’re on television they kind of view you in a different way. Many times over the years I have felt as if I’m just the person in a box. And when I’m in public and people look at me sometimes they don’t say, “Hi” to me. They stand a couple of feet away and talk about me to their friends, in a polite way. But as if I can’t really hear them, because I’m still inside this box.

ROB:    I’ve heard stories over the years of people phoning various TV stations and instead of talking about the stories their comments are on the person’s hair or the wardrobe.

TONI:   That happens a lot. I like to think that I don’t know why they do that. But I do that as well, if I’m watching a television show. I might say, “Ooh, I don’t like that dress that that woman is wearing.” But when it happens to me, I get kind of offended or bothered by it. I guess it’s just human nature.

And I think we have to understand that if we want people to welcome us into their homes that we are opening ourselves up to so much more than that.

If we are trying to make a personal connection in our program, we then have to accept the fact that they’re going to be quite personal with us.

But, it can be tough. You really have to develop a thick skin. And I still don’t have a thick skin.

So, if somebody calls and they say they didn’t like my hair. It really bothers me. I laugh it off and I say, “Okay, I’ll style it differently tomorrow.” When I have naturally curly hair, but I straighten it most often for television, because it just looks nicer.

But every now and then I will wear my hair curly. Once a gentleman sent me a comb in the mail and asked that I comb my hair.

ROB:     Ooh.

TONI:   I was devastated. But I’m sure he meant it in the nicest of ways. And if he had seen my actual reaction he probably would have felt bad. You have to realize that people really don’t mean any harm. And when they give you criticism they really mean it to be constructive criticism.

They may think they’re talking to their friend. “Hey, that’s Toni Marie. She’s in my living room every night. She’s been there for twenty years. I think I have the right to tell her if her hair is bad.” You have to try and get over it.

A Week of Daily Posts

Drizzle on a Sunday morning in Kingston.  I’ve complained about how bad the weather has been this summer, but this officially shows me that fall might be starting up earlier than usual too.  Did resemble weather in Newfoundland so I liked it better than rain.

Still awaiting word on Dawg FM.  CRTC said on their website that the decision would come out last week.  Guess what?  Didn’t happen.  Friday came and went and nothing.  So maybe it will come out after the weekend.  But at this point, your guess is as good as mine.

As for the title, doing a new blog post every day this week.  Have a text version of the interview with Toni Marie Wiseman I did recently.  It’s too long for one post so I’ll divide it up over the week.

It is also a week where she’s on vacation so you can’t see her on NTV this week.  Out of all places for her to visit, it isn’t one I would have guessed.  Costa Rica.  I don’t even want to guess how long that day of flying must’ve been.

Onto the interview.  Not a word for word transcript since I edited to make it easier to read.  Reading an interview is much different than listening to one.

Today it’s how Toni Marie got into broadcasting and talking about her radio career before she started in television.

ROB:    Welcome to the show, Toni.

TONI:   Thank you very much for having me Rob.

ROB:    I know myself as an Army Brat, I moved around a lot. And you moved around a lot on the east coast.

TONI:   I did, yes.

ROB:    So, how was growing up in different towns over the years?

TONI:   You may feel the same way, when I was growing up I found it quite difficult. Being in a place for two years and then moving. Having to leave friends behind make new friends, and start all over.

But now especially because of the work that I do with NTV I find that having moved around, really allowed me to feel connected with each part of the province.

When I have to talk about a particular event that’s happening in Corner Brook I can relate to that.  Because I lived in towns like Corner Brook, Gander and Grand Falls-Windsor.

While it was difficult when I was younger, it was really a blessing. It’s allowed me to find out much more about the province. Many people don’t have the luxury of having lived all over the place. So, it’s a good thing.

ROB:    I got used to it pretty quickly. By the time I was five I was in three or four towns.

TONI:   The only sad thing is when people that I know, some of them have friends that they’ve had since they were three or four.

And I don’t. That’s what I think I’ve missed out on. I don’t really have any friends that I’ve had for years and years. But I have lots of great friends now, so, I’m none the worse from my ordeal, I suppose.

ROB:    I know you went to Memorial for one year and then went to journalism school.

TONI:   I did. And that was my father’s idea. I was a very shy girl. I was always very young for my age. Probably five years younger emotionally than my peers were. When I went to university [Acadia] first I got sick. So, I had to move home.

Then I went to MUN [Memorial University]. You may have found this too, because I moved around so much, my parents, especially my mom were kind of my best friends. Moving away from them for the first time I found quite difficult.

My first year at Memorial University I didn’t do as well as I should have. Or I could have. And a lot of it was home sickness.

My father said, “Well, how about you take a year off and take this course? It’s a broadcasting course. This is kind of what you want to do. Take the year do the course. And if you really enjoy it then maybe you’ll be more motivated.”

I thought, that’s fair, so to my dad who’s been paying for my education. So that’s what I did.

Began in September of ’86. By December, we were shipped off to various parts of the province to do some on the job training. I was sent to Corner Brook, where my brother lived at the time. And I did so well there that they hired me.

I realized that this was something that I really wanted to do. I was quite lucky.

I started working full time at CFCB in Corner Brook just a few short months after I started the program. Then I made a transfer to Grand Falls Windsor to a VOCM affiliate station. After that I went to the head station 590 VOCM in St. Johns.

Basically I was working with another affiliate station with VOCM called VOFM as the morning traffic person. You drive around and tell people if there are slowdowns or if this road is closed.

I had to be at work for four in the morning which I found quite difficult. It’s one of those jobs that can tire, can wear on a person after a while. It was a great entry level job, but it’s not the most creative job you can do in broadcasting.

I was getting a little bored, when the opportunity arose that I could apply for a job at NTV and I did.

Link to Toni Marie Interview

Back from Toronto so some time to upload Friday’s episode with Toni Marie.  Next few weeks I think and try and get someone to transcribe it.  We’ll see how that goes.  Sure a few fans would be interested in reading it as well.

Show on Saturday with Ian Foster was great, I’ll write more during the week when I’m not so tired from the weekend. 🙂

On to Friday’s episode.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicJuly10th2009Hour1

In this episode an interview I did with Toni Marie Wiseman of NTV. Play parts of the chat along with songs by Newfoundland artists throughout the show. First radio interview Toni’s done in a long time. Since she also works for OZFM she can’t chat with one of the competing stations in the province.

I open the show with Ian Foster, who was playing Toronto that weekend. I saw him at The Cameron House on Saturday Night.

During this hour’s part of Toni Marie’s interview I play songs by Ron Hynes, Great Big Sea and Teresa Ennis.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicJuly10th2009Hour2

2nd hour with the rest of the interview with Toni Marie Wiseman. Touch on a few different topics like Facebook, World of Warcraft, her favourite songs and when she spent a couple of nights in a Women’s Correctional facility for a TV report.

Music of Great Big Sea with Fergus O’Byrne and Dermot O’Reilly, Kenny Butler, Ron Hynes, and a surprise 80’s pop song which is Toni’s favourite.

End the hour with some instrumental Ian Foster as he was hitting Ontario that weekend with his Canadian Tour.

Thanks to Toni Marie for doing the interview.

Tomorrow Night/Toni Marie

Finishing the editing of the interview with Toni Marie right now.  I know, a bit late but there’s not much to do.  So I’ll air the entire thing tomorrow night.  Probably longer clips than usual during the show since she has some great stories.   About starting out in radio, getting tricked during a sportscast, spending time at a jail for NTV [was for a TV report] and about a guy vacuuming the red carpet at the Junos.  That last one I liked a lot.  Shows the difference between St. John’s and Toronto people. 🙂

During the show the music of Great Big Sea, Teresa Ennis, Fergus O’Byrne, Kenny Butler and Ron Hynes.  And I’ll have to make a Canadian Content exception for Toni and play a certain 80’s British song.  It’s one of her favourites so it’s only fair.

Visiting Toronto this weekend.  Seeing Ian Foster play on Saturday Night.  What good timing with the garbage strike in Toronto, eh?  So I won’t be walking the streets of the city too much if it’s a scorcher.  Day 16 of the strike I believe.  Yikes.

So the link for the episode won’t go up till Monday or Tuesday this week after I get back and have some time to get it online.

Tomorrow night as usual, 6-8pm EST.

http://www.cfrc.ca

‘Best Of’ Tonight

Been a long week and the plan for this week’s show got pushed up a week.  But there will be interviews tonight on the show, first “best of” show so to speak.  After 2 years I’m finally digging into the archives.

Half the show will be the hour from 2007 with the first interview I did for the show.  With Ian Foster.  Had some of Ian’s music along with some other bands on the old Saturday Night timeslot.

Second half will be the hour with Teresa Ennis from Feb. 2008.  Had the interview with her and her CD ‘Space’.

Next Friday will be the new interview with Ian Foster along with his brand new music for 2 hours.

Following Friday I have the chat with Toni Marie Wiseman I did a few days ago.  Went very well.  Talked over an hour and there were still things we never got to.  Did cover a lot of things with Toni.  She mentioned some artists during our interview so I’ll play them during the 2 hours when that airs.

I’ll probably upload a short sound clip here over the next few days to give you a preview of it.

If I can I’ll see if I can get someone to transcribe it.  Went quite well and people might like to read it too.  Like her 5000 friends on Facebook. 🙂

So hopefully you’ll enjoy the “best of” tonight or its other name, a rerun. LOL.

Upcoming Interviews

Looks like things are a go for taping an interview tomorrow with Toni Marie Wiseman.  As readers might remember she did a print interview with me for the Newfoundland Herald.  Which is the reason I got to chat with Fergus O’Byrne and Ray Johnson of Buddy Wasisname.

Toni’s been a friend of mine for years so it should be fun.

For those not in Newfoundland or haven’t watched NTV on satellite she has a few jobs at NTV/OZFM/Herald.  Let’s see. [For those who think I do a few things at CFRC, please she has me beat.]

On the TV side she does reports covering the local arts scene. She’s a news anchor 4 days a week on Newsday and on the Sunday Evening Newshour.  Also does the live weather remotes during the 6pm news, Monday-Thursday.  Sometime during the week she writes/produces/hosts a 30 minute Entertainment News show that airs on Saturday.

Add to that she does some news updates on OZFM radio during the afternoon.  Oh, and Toni writes pieces covering the arts for the Newfoundland Herald too.

Other than that she’s not busy at all. 🙂

Covering the music scene in Newfoundland is what I’ll chat with her a lot about.  She was awarded Media Person of the Year by MusicNL 4 years in a row from 2000-2003.

But since we’re friends we can go off-topic.  She’s gotten hooked on World of Warcraft the last couple of years.  I don’t understand that game but she really enjoys it.

And we’re both big Monty Python fans who can quote the movies.  Yes, those type of fans.

Quite a “get” for a little show like mine.  I’ll give an update after it’s over tomorrow night.

This Friday will be the Ian Foster interview, if the CD’s get here by then.  I’d say they get here so that’s the plan for Friday Night.

Herald Interview, text version

Realize I had a scan of it, but not the full text version of the interview. Oops. So here it is.

Up Close and Personal by Toni Marie Wiseman
Rob Carnell – Airing the East Coast

There’s no questioning the popularity of East Coast music. Our talented musicians and their catchy tunes have been enough to fill bar-rooms and concert halls from here to Vancouver, throughout the United States, Europe and even the Middle East. But a radio show in Kingston, Ontario, of all places is stretching the reach of our music even further.

The show, called Salt Water Music on Queen’s University’s CFRC, is hosted by Rob Carnell, a Newfoundlander by birth who has found his niche in the Ontario radio market by playing music to expatriates. What he didn’t expect was that his show would become popular, not just in Ontario, but around the globe.

“I’ve heard back from people listening all over the world. I’ve received email from the U.S., France, Japan and Australia,” says Carnell.

His Salt Water Music show was conceived almost by accident. While working at CFRC as a technical producer for Queen’s football games, he started going on air either during intermissions or after the game until the next show started.

“I was mostly reading sports or playing music,” he recalls. Then the time came for him to actually fill on the air for an hour. “I had an hour to play whatever I wanted. It was a Sunday night, Oscar night as a matter of fact. The weekend before that I had seen the news about Dermot O’Reilly’s passing, so that Sunday I scrambled and put together an hour of Ryan’s Fancy.”

By spring the station management asked Carnell to host a regular program. He mentioned he’d like the format to be all East Coast Canadian music. His reasoning?

“We always had that music in my house. I thought it would be nice to get some airplay in Ontario for those artists. In the 1980’s there was a radio show in Toronto that played music from Newfoundland. I thought there are many people in Ontario that would like to hear some music from home.”

The show is now in full swing and a summer fill-in program is a regular weekly fixture on CFRC. It airs Friday nights from 7:30pm to 9:30pm Newfoundland time. The station can also be heard online at http://www.cfrc.ca

—-

Why did you want to do a radio show in Ontario featuring East Coast music?

I always tried to keep tabs on East Coast Music. I left Newfoundland at a young age and my family moved around Canada. My family always had some music from home with us. Remember listening to that growing up.

So I looked around and saw there wasn’t a lot of radio shows focusing just on East Coast music in Ontario. Since it was a genre I was familiar with I thought it might be an idea that could work well.

Was it difficult convincing the radio station to go with your format?

No, not at all. Since CFRC is a campus/community station they’re always looking for Canadian music to play. An hour of that type of music was right down their alley.

What was their reaction to what you wanted to do?

They liked the show, since it was a lot of music that they hadn’t heard before. It started out as fill-in show for the summer months in 2007. But the show was well received and I’ve been doing it every week since then.

Who are some of the NL artists you play?

In the first year I played over 120 artists from Atlantic Canada so it’s a long list. But ones I can name off the top of my head include Ian Foster, Teresa Ennis, Gulliver’s Spree, Great Big Sea, Ryan’s Fancy, Shanneyganock, Ron Hynes, Joe Belly & the Sin City Ramblers, The Idlers, Damhnait Doyle, Hey Rosetta!, Duane Andrews, Allison Crowe, Rawlins Cross, The Irish Descendants.

Where do you get the music?

A lot of it I find online. Either through an artist’s website or their MySpace page. Some email me MP3’s of their music or send along a CD of theirs. Then someone points out another musician I might be interested in. Start networking with people you talk to.

The station also gets new CD’s every week or two. I go through them and find artists from the East Coast. With that I have to sit down with a pile of CD’s and find out which ones are from Atlantic Canada. Little more time consuming but I always find some new artists that way that I hadn’t known before.

What has been the reaction by East Coast artists to your show?

Very positive. With the online feed it allows them to hear the show. More than a few of them tell me it’s been the first time they’ve heard their music played on the radio. That’s something I never expected. Someone from my home province saying I was the first person to play them on the radio.

What has been reaction from your listeners?

Great and far reaching. Heard from listeners who tune in every week to the show, or who listen to it online afterwards. They say they really enjoy the show. Gotten emails from one listener in Sydney, Australia. She’s not from Canada but listened one week for a specific band she liked. Became a regular listener ever since.

Are more and more East coast artists sending you their music for your show?

Yes, I’ve found more artists sending me their music. Having a MySpace page and blog for the radio show helps a lot. People who hear about the show can find out where to contact me fairly quickly.

Have you interviewed many of these artists for your show? (Who have you interviewed?)

I have done interviews with musicians over the phone. Ian Foster is the first one I ever did while he was on tour in Ottawa. Interviewed him again this past summer. Also spoke to Teresa Ennis earlier this year.

Who’s been the best interview to date? (Why?)

That would have to be Teresa Ennis. Main reason is the background before the interview.

My radio show was the first one anywhere to play her some of her solo work. I found some songs on her MySpace page in the summer of 2007. Emailed her about playing them that week on the show. I didn’t know she had just uploaded them that very week. So Teresa and her friends ended up listening online to the show when I played the music that week. That was a fun interview since I got to ask her about that night when she got to hear it for the first time on the radio.

How much did you know about East Coast music before you started the show?

I had a general knowledge of East Coast Music. But I’ve learned a lot about the depth of talent in each genre. Internet has made it much easier to find out more information. Even 10 years ago it would’ve been much harder to do a similar show.

Do you ever get the chance to meet these artists in person or hear them live?

This past summer in Toronto I went to see Allison Crowe and Ian Foster. Luckily both were playing on the same weekend. Was fun to see two people I’ve played on air come to Ontario for a few shows.

How do you stay on top of what’s happening in East Coast music?

I read online sources like magazines, newspapers or radio websites. Since I have satellite TV I do watch some local news broadcasts from Atlantic Canada. Always find some new artists mentioned on those.

Do you get the chance to visit NL often?

No, it’s been too long. Last time was 10 years ago. One of those things where I never thought it was a long time ago then I realized 10 years had passed.

What does your family think of your show?

They enjoy listening to the show. On Boxing Day my Mom phoned me to tell me my Aunt in Placentia was listening online. I was born in Placentia that was nice to hear.

What’s next for your show?

Looking to do more interviews with artists in 2009. I have two almost lined up so that’s a good start. Other than that I’m always looking to get the word out about the show. More listeners would mean more exposure for the musicians on the show.

Which NL artist would you most like to interview for your show?

That would have to be Denis Ryan or Fergus O’Byrne. 6 months before my first show I filled in for someone at the station. I had free reign to cover any topic. It was the week after Dermot O’Reilly passed away so I put together a tribute show to Ryan’s Fancy. So that ended up being a precursor to what my show became. So interviewing Denis or Fergus would be a great honour.