Tagged: toni marie wiseman

Toni Marie Wiseman Interview from 2009

This summer planning on an follow up interview with Toni Marie Wiseman, in the meantime thought I’d go back to 2009. We chatted then and it aired over a 2 hour episode of the program.

http://archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicJuly10th2009Hour1

http://archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicJuly10th2009Hour2

I also had the interview transcribed in 2009. Originally it was divided up over a week but here I’ll put it all in one big post. Going back and reading the old posts I found out I posted it while she was on vacation in Costa Rica. This week she’s also on vacation, but close to home.

This is not a word for word transcript since I did some editing to make it easier to read. Reading an interview is much different than listening to one. This whole post is over 7000 words so sit back, relax and take your time. First part was how she got into broadcasting.

ROB: Welcome to the show, Toni.

TONI: Thank you very much for having me Rob.

ROB: I know myself as an Army Brat, I moved around a lot. And you moved around a lot on the east coast.

TONI: I did, yes.

ROB: So, how was growing up in different towns over the years?

TONI: You may feel the same way, when I was growing up I found it quite difficult. Being in a place for two years and then moving. Having to leave friends behind make new friends, and start all over.

But now especially because of the work that I do with NTV I find that having moved around, really allowed me to feel connected with each part of the province.

When I have to talk about a particular event that’s happening in Corner Brook I can relate to that. Because I lived in towns like Corner Brook, Gander and Grand Falls-Windsor.

While it was difficult when I was younger, it was really a blessing. It’s allowed me to find out much more about the province. Many people don’t have the luxury of having lived all over the place. So, it’s a good thing.

ROB: I got used to it pretty quickly. By the time I was five I was in three or four towns.

TONI: The only sad thing is when people that I know, some of them have friends that they’ve had since they were three or four.

And I don’t. That’s what I think I’ve missed out on. I don’t really have any friends that I’ve had for years and years. But I have lots of great friends now, so, I’m none the worse from my ordeal, I suppose.

ROB: I know you went to Memorial for one year and then went to journalism school.

TONI: I did. And that was my father’s idea. I was a very shy girl. I was always very young for my age. Probably five years younger emotionally than my peers were. When I went to university [Acadia] first I got sick. So, I had to move home.

Then I went to MUN [Memorial University]. You may have found this too, because I moved around so much, my parents, especially my mom were kind of my best friends. Moving away from them for the first time I found quite difficult.

My first year at Memorial University I didn’t do as well as I should have. Or I could have. And a lot of it was home sickness.

My father said, “Well, how about you take a year off and take this course? It’s a broadcasting course. This is kind of what you want to do. Take the year do the course. And if you really enjoy it then maybe you’ll be more motivated.”

I thought, that’s fair, so to my dad who’s been paying for my education. So that’s what I did.

Began in September of ’86. By December, we were shipped off to various parts of the province to do some on the job training. I was sent to Corner Brook, where my brother lived at the time. And I did so well there that they hired me.

I realized that this was something that I really wanted to do. I was quite lucky.

I started working full time at CFCB in Corner Brook just a few short months after I started the program. Then I made a transfer to Grand Falls Windsor to a VOCM affiliate station. After that I went to the head station 590 VOCM in St. Johns.

Basically I was working with another affiliate station with VOCM called VOFM as the morning traffic person. You drive around and tell people if there are slowdowns or if this road is closed.

I had to be at work for four in the morning which I found quite difficult. It’s one of those jobs that can tire, can wear on a person after a while. It was a great entry level job, but it’s not the most creative job you can do in broadcasting.

I was getting a little bored, when the opportunity arose that I could apply for a job at NTV and I did.

In this part of the interview, Toni Marie starts about the differences she found when switching from radio to TV. But we start off with the day she went in for a job interview with NTV.

TONI: I was quite nervous since didn’t know if I was a television kind of person. Radio as you know is so much freer in many ways.

In many ways you can be more expressive physically than you can on TV. On TV people can see if you talk with your hands a lot. In radio they don’t see that.

One of the first things I had to do was read news on camera. I’d read news but never from a teleprompter. And the teleprompter that day wasn’t working. So, I had to kind of cheat. Where you look down and look up at the same time. Of course I didn’t have any experience in that. So, I thought I had done a terrible job.

But the next day they called and offered me the job. I guess they saw some potential and nearly twenty years later I’m still there.

ROB: I’ve used the teleprompter a couple of times when I took TV broadcasting at Algonquin College in Ottawa. Have a few memories of when the teleprompter would break down. And then we’d have to do exactly what you said, read off the script.

TONI: In many stations they have an auto-cue person. A a tech person who controls the teleprompter for the news anchors. Which means somebody else controls the pace of your reading.

People who have worked at other television stations and come to work for us find our set up very peculiar and aren’t used to it.

At our station we get to control it ourselves. I control the speed myself. And I find it works quite well, because I read a lot faster than most people. I’m not waiting or anticipating when the teleprompter or auto queue is going to move.

Also it gives you something to do with your hands when you’re on television. As I said, you can’t talk with your hands like you do in radio so it gives you something to hold when you’re there. That’s the one thing people say when I interview them is, “What do I do with my hands?”

When you’re anchoring a newscast at our station at least you have that problem solved for you.

ROB: What was the hardest part of the transition from radio to TV when you started? I guess it’s getting used to people recognizing you on the street instead of by your voice.

TONI: Well, yes, a lot of that. And also in radio you don’t really have to dress up.

A lot of what I’d done in radio was overnights when there isn’t a lot of management around. They don’t care if you wear blue jeans and a T-shirt. You can’t wear that when you’re on television anchoring the news.

Radio is live and television is live, but they can see terror on your face. You can hide nervousness fairly well on the radio. You can’t on TV.

And it’s all those sorts of things that you don’t really pick up until you see yourself television. “Why do I tilt my head when I ask a question? That looks so foolish.”

I still love radio and a lot of the time I miss it. Radio is more personal in many ways. When people listen to their favorite radio announcer they really feel a warm, fuzzy connection to that voice.

When you’re on television they kind of view you in a different way. Many times over the years I have felt as if I’m just the person in a box. And when I’m in public and people look at me sometimes they don’t say, “Hi” to me. They stand a couple of feet away and talk about me to their friends, in a polite way. But as if I can’t really hear them, because I’m still inside this box.

ROB: I’ve heard stories over the years of people phoning various TV stations and instead of talking about the stories their comments are on the person’s hair or the wardrobe.

TONI: That happens a lot. I like to think that I don’t know why they do that. But I do that as well, if I’m watching a television show. I might say, “Ooh, I don’t like that dress that that woman is wearing.” But when it happens to me, I get kind of offended or bothered by it. I guess it’s just human nature.

And I think we have to understand that if we want people to welcome us into their homes that we are opening ourselves up to so much more than that.

If we are trying to make a personal connection in our program, we then have to accept the fact that they’re going to be quite personal with us.

But, it can be tough. You really have to develop a thick skin. And I still don’t have a thick skin.

So, if somebody calls and they say they didn’t like my hair. It really bothers me. I laugh it off and I say, “Okay, I’ll style it differently tomorrow.” When I have naturally curly hair, but I straighten it most often for television, because it just looks nicer.

But every now and then I will wear my hair curly. Once a gentleman sent me a comb in the mail and asked that I comb my hair.

ROB: Ooh.

TONI: I was devastated. But I’m sure he meant it in the nicest of ways. And if he had seen my actual reaction he probably would have felt bad. You have to realize that people really don’t mean any harm. And when they give you criticism they really mean it to be constructive criticism.

They may think they’re talking to their friend. “Hey, that’s Toni Marie. She’s in my living room every night. She’s been there for twenty years. I think I have the right to tell her if her hair is bad.” You have to try and get over it.

Today’s part of the interview starts off with the reach of NTV.  If you’ve wondered why their weather forecast always mentions Tampa Bay, Florida when they show North America there is a reason.  Also how she switched to covering Entertainment. 


ROB: Now for those who might not have the seen the station. You have several jobs. You are a news anchor, Sunday evenings and noon hour weekdays. And you do the weather reports, 6pm Monday to Thursday.

TONI: Which are live. Actually they’re live hits in the community. And I read radio news still. I also write a bi-weekly column for our sister magazine called the Newfoundland Herald. That’s over sixty years old now.

We have a lot of viewers in Ontario and throughout the country.

A lot of Newfoundlanders moved to Ontario twenty, thirty years ago. I dare you to find somebody from Ontario who doesn’t know someone from Newfoundland.

We are on satellite, on Bell Express Vu and Star Choice. So, we’re seen by Ex Patriot Newfoundlanders across the country and in the United States as well. They get to stay connected with home and see how Newfoundland has grown up quite a bit since they’ve left.

ROB: I know at least in some cities that NTV has also started popping up on digital cable. Ontario, Alberta among some places.

TONI: The oddest thing happened to me several years ago. I was visiting British Columbia, which is a beautiful province. I was on Vancouver Island and with some people who lived in Nanaimo. We went into a big box store and in the television section, NTV was on. That was a little strange. But it was really nice.

ROB: It’s also on in the Caribbean.

TONI: Yes, and in Tampa Bay, Florida. A lot of people across Canada and Newfoundland winter in Florida. Because of that I guess there’s a market for it.

ROB: I found that station online, I think about a year ago. And they even have a live stream, you can technically watch NTV online. They show, the Noon news and half of the 6 o’clock news. I was here at the station one night, just before my show. And I thought to try the feed and I watched a half hour of the news here on the computer. I think it’s mostly Greek programming of all things.

TONI: Yes, it’s a Greek television station.

ROB: So NTV is all over the place.

TONI: We are. I’m sure when Mr. Sterling, started this station many decades ago he never dreamed it would be seen around North America.

I’m sure he wished it would but it’s come a long way. And people are really embracing the station. We have fans across the country who have no real connection to Newfoundland. They stumbled on it and enjoyed watching our news.

Before stations went digital, when everything was still analog people could pick us up anywhere. We used to get fan mail from places like Montana and Kentucky.

We got a photo from a nudist colony. Because many years ago we would say, “If you’re watching us from somewhere else in the country or throughout North America, send us a picture of your group. And we’ll put it on TV.”

Well, that picture we couldn’t actually put on TV but we did mention it.

ROB: I know you have won several awards for your other job you at the station covering the local arts scene. You have also Entertainment News, which a program you tape during the week and airs on Saturday nights.

TONI: That’s right.

ROB: So, this must be one of the more rewarding parts of the job. Helping support music and the arts.

TONI: Absolutely. I would dare you to find a person who at some point in their childhood maybe didn’t want to be a rock star, or an actress or a dancer. I wanted to be all of those things… unfortunately I don’t sing very well. I don’t act very well. And I really am not a very good dancer.

So, for me to be able to meet all of these artistic people is such a thrill. To be able to sit down with someone like Teresa Ennis who is such a talented and beautiful woman. To talk to her about her music is fantastic.

I remember when she and her sisters were first signed to Warner Music. We were at an East Coast Music Association conference. And they were very young girls at that time. They kind of looked at me like a big sister for that moment in time. We all kind of bonded during that weekend.

And then they were signing their first record deal. It was really exciting for me too, and emotional. Even though I’m supposed to be this hardnosed TV person, I do get caught up with the people I interview. It’s great to see how well Teresa has done. It’s a beautiful thing to have been able to watch her grow since the beginning.

Damhnait Doyle is another. The first time I interviewed her, I guess she was about eighteen years old. And I mean she’s another fantastic talent. And to see how far she’s come.

ROB: What was it like doing your entertainment reports when you started? I know originally you were doing news and then moved over to covering the arts.

TONI: Yes, which was great for me and for the station. We’re supposed to be these hardnosed kinds of people in many ways. You’re not supposed to become personally involved or care about the people you interview.

It was quite difficult for me doing news stories and having to ask people questions that made them uncomfortable or made them upset. I really wasn’t that great at it.

If I was interviewing somebody and they didn’t want to answer the question I wouldn’t ask the question another way like most smart news reporters will do. I would just kind of say, “Oh that’s okay. I’m sorry. I didn’t mean to ask you that question.”

That doesn’t fly when you’re a news reporter, at least not with the news director. They thought that I was a great writer and that I could read and speak well. That I had great creative ideas, but probably not for news.

They allowed me to explore the entertainment field. They didn’t have anyone covering entertainment on a full-time basis at that point. That became my new job, in addition to the anchoring roles and radio roles that I had. But it was great. I’ve been doing that now for many years. And I think it’s the best thing that ever could have happened to me or for the company.

[This part was before 2010 Junos] First is a chat about the previous Junos in St. John’s, which is returning to town in 2010.

Thanks to Brent from The Lever Pulled for this comment on the MySpace page. I assume Brent was the one from the band who posted it. [Yes, the old MySpace page]

“Toni is only young but she’s already a legend in Newfoundland media and a big part of Newfoundland culture. That’s not an exaggeration. Mention the name Toni-Marie to ANYONE in this province and they know who you are talking about.”

Which shows how down to earth she is with the red carpet story she had at the last Junos.

—-
ROB: One of the big events years ago was the Junos in St. John’s, which are coming back next year. From what I’ve heard that week there was a lot of partying going.

TONI: What happens at the Junos in St. John’s, stays at the Junos in St. John’s. I’m kidding.

It was great fun. We got to meet a lot of people. In Newfoundland people aren’t afraid to say hello to you. When you go live on location in Newfoundland you kind of expect the unexpected. It was just before the live telecast show, the red carpet walk.

Before that started happening for the mother network [CTV], I was doing some live remotes for our newscast that was happening. And there were reporters from across the country. Some of the top entertainment reporters from all the major stations.

And a young guy came out to vacuum the red carpet while I was speaking. And I didn’t flinch, because it was his job.

When I stopped that particular live remote, which was probably thirty seconds to a minute, all the reporters basically jumped on this poor young fellow.

‘How could you do that? She was live.’

And I kind of had to get in there and say,

‘Listen, it’s his job. He has to make sure that red carpet is clean before the live telecast. What I’m doing isn’t necessarily as important as what he is doing.’

They just kind of looked at me like, ‘What? What?’

I said, ‘Well, his job was that he was sent out here to vacuum that carpet.’

But they couldn’t understand how I was able to keep focus while a vacuum cleaner was running.
—-

The TV people from the big cities can learn something from her. Then we talked about the weather hits. Don’t be surprised if you see her lugging around equipment if you see her around town.

Onto a memory of talking to Great Big Sea when they started out. Which leads into talking about Alan Doyle/Russell Crowe and the Robin Hood movie they’re in. Which left an opening for me to bring up that we both are big Monty Python fans.

—-

TONI: When I do my live remotes a lot of people are surprised that it’s only myself and usually Dan Lake. Dan the camera man as we affectionately call him.

We don’t have a lighting person or a makeup person or a sound person. We don’t have someone to carry the equipment for us. I’m on the ground duct taping cables as well as Dan is. We’re used to having to do everything.

Being on our own, very little will throw us at this point. And if it does we just make it part of the show, because it’s live television. I think the viewers at home like to see that. I’m sure when I was reading and the guy came out to vacuum the carpet, everyone watching TV at that point thought that was the neatest thing they’d seen. Here is this young guy about seventeen years old out with his little vacuum cleaner.

ROB: Talking about the live hits sometimes you community ones and other times they just stick you outside in the snowstorm. I read you thought the people stayed tuned to the weather on bad nights just to see you outside in the storm?

TONI: Yes, and see the Tammy Faye Baker eyes. It can be really uncomfortable.

But it’s funny, when I first started doing the live remotes I was in my twenties. And all I cared about in my twenties as most of us women do when we’re in our twenties. Not all, but many. We want to look pretty.

We’re not going to wear a big bulky jacket to make us look heavier. We’re going to wear the teeniest little jacket we can get away with. And we’re going to try to have the hair perfect and everything, and I couldn’t possibly wear a hat.

Well, now that I’m considerably older than twenty, I wear a full snow-suit now. I just want to be warm and dry and comfortable. And when I’m warm and dry I perform better too.

ROB: Was this winter a bad one, worse or better than usual?

TONI: It was a lot colder than usual. So, I had to deal with that quite a bit. I started wearing the ear muffs along with the snowsuit. But we didn’t have as much snow as we had in previous years. I mean one year we had about six, seven feet of snow. In one snow fall we had seventy-four centimeters.

ROB: That’s a lot.

TONI: That’s a lot.

[Not a typo we said the same thing]

TONI: This year you know our worst month might have been thirty. This was a good winter, but very cold.

ROB: I did notice some storms where the snow is swirling around and blowing in your face.

TONI: And it takes your breath away. Because the camera is such an expensive piece of equipment we can’t throw away the camera to save me. So, it’s the other way around. I’m positioned in a way that it’s not so much that I look my best. But it’s so that the camera doesn’t get blown over or damaged from all the snow.

That usually means I’m in the most uncomfortable place to be. But I guess it’s almost like an actor on a stage and you have a prop to work with. And the prop makes you do different things.

When I’m out and there isn’t a whole lot to talk about other than the fact that I’m standing in a raging blizzard. Then the blizzard is my friend, because I have plenty to talk about. And people like to see weather people in weather.

That’s what we’re supposed to do. We understand how horrible the weather is. They can feel fine when they complain about it or if I complain about it, because they know I’m in it too.

I’m not in some cozy perfect little studio with a green screen behind me, which we have done from time to time. But in the major snowstorms I’m outside. I’m outside braving the elements as everyone else will have to do when they get out and pick up that shovel.

ROB: Wtih all the various jobs you have at the station, you must enjoy the mix. Every day is different, so to speak.

TONI: Every day is different and the same. I meet different people every day. That’s the best part of the job. I do an entertainment report or two every week, but it’s always somebody different. It’s fun. I feel guilty sometimes, because I have so much fun doing the work that I do.

It gets back to what I was talking about earlier, a feeling of attachment to what’s happening in the arts community. That adds to the fun, I really get caught up in how people advance.

I mentioned Teresa Ennis, but the first time I had interviewed Great Big Sea, they had never won any awards before. And they had been nominated for an ECMA.

We were at Alan Doyle’s house at the time. He and Sean McCann were there. And I saw like this little ornament on a mantelpiece. I handed it to them and said, ‘Okay, pretend for me that you’ve just won your first ECMA. And what would say?’

Of course the first thing they said was, “We’d like to thank God.” Because that’s what everybody says, which was nice.

It was funny to see and I still have that tape. To remember that and be a part of that and their excitement. Now to see them as grown men with families.

Alan Doyle now starring in a movie with Russell Crowe, who’s apparently one of his good buds. And I can say that I knew them when.

ROB: I’ve seen pictures online of Robin Hood. Russell Crowe and Cate Blanchett I believe are in that movie. Alan is over there for I think about six to nine months.

TONI: Alan, oddly enough or maybe not that odd, he plays kind of like a minstrel does he not? Like a roving musician. And his name in the film, I believe is Alan A’dayle.

ROB: Kind of like the singing character from Holy Grail.

TONI: Yes. “He is brave sir Robin.” I think it’s quite fitting.

ROB: Slightly off topic, we’re both Monty Python fans. I guess you can’t use that in any report on NTV.

TONI: No.

ROB: I know The Meaning of Life is your favorite one.

TONI: I do like the Meaning of Life. I’ve seen it so many time that usually when I watch it now, I do need to watch it alone, because I recite the entire movie. It’s not good, when there are other people in the room. And Monty Python, I think it’s brilliant humor, as I know you do.

ROB: Yes.

TONI: Very intelligent, but a lot of people don’t get it. They just think it’s too foolish to talk about. When I’m singing some of the songs that are in the film that we won’t sing now, on this wonderful radio station people think I’m a little crazy.

ROB: And all the guys in Python were university educated.

TONI: Yes. We’ll have to watch these sometime. One of my co-workers Larry Jay, who anchors the Sunday evening news with me, is also a huge fan of Monty Python. I think he can recite even Flying Circus, the television program itself. He can recite I think everything they’ve ever done.

ROB: I was watching a few months ago the DVD of Holy Grail with John Cleese’s commentary. He had a story about meeting an American football player in the 70’s. The player said him and a teammate were big fans of Holy Grail.

One game they’re just getting crushed by the other team. It’s getting near the end of the game. They’re in the huddle said “What should we do?” One guy whispered to the other one, “Run away. Run away.” And they started cracking up during the next play. John was amazed that this silly thing they wrote for this movie were being used by these players during a game.

TONI: Maybe they could all sing the Lumberjack song. That might do well.

Once in an email to me at the end she said “talk to you later, Sir Not Appearing in this film”. If you get that reference you know why I was impressed. A one line joke in Holy Grail. 🙂

Next section goes to a more serious part. As part of a TV report Toni Marie spent a few days in the Women’s Correctional Facility in Clarenville.

ROB: A few years ago you had an report where you spend a few nights in a women’s correctional facility. That must have been an incredibly interesting few days.

TONI: It was. I got the idea from watching a story from an American network where a really well known news anchor did that. She went in and stayed in a women’s correctional facility for a few days.

I called a few people that I knew in the Justice Department. Some of them pulled a few strings for me. I was able to stay a few nights in a minimum security women’s prison in Clarenville.

Myself and a female camera person went. We weren’t strip searched or anything, but had to shower when we got there. Gave them our civilian clothing and wore hand me down clothing that they had. At first we had to wear that. Then they laundered our clothing and gave it back to us.

We slept in a cell and ate with the inmates. At first when we got there we were quite nervous.

But most of these women weren’t in there for violent offenses. They were in for fraud and that type of thing. We learned pretty quickly that we weren’t in any physical danger.

It was really emotional to speak to some of these women. To find out why they were doing the things they were doing. Most of these women were moms and missed their families tremendously. They had photographs and letters from their children. It was really heart wrenching.

Very few of them acted as if they didn’t deserve to be there. Most of them said, “Look, I have committed these crimes. And I’m serving the time.” That was an interesting thing, because usually you think that everyone is going to say they were wrongfully convicted. But we didn’t get that.

One woman was serving a much longer sentence. She was convicted of manslaughter for having killed her common law husband. Through the interview with her, and in the trial it came out that he abused her quite a bit. This was her way of trying not be attacked this particular night.

She picked up small kitchen knife. When he came towards her she poked at him to get him away. Knife went in and nicked his heart, he died instantly. Could’ve gotten him in the shoulder, but she didn’t. It wasn’t premeditated.

From talking to her we found out that she’d been abused in every way possible since she’d been about four years old. Practically every relationship she’d been in with a man had been abusive in some form or another since she was that age.

She had very low self esteem, and ended up finding herself in this sort of relationship over and over again. I guess she was at the breaking point. It was heart wrenching for her. She also had a child that wasn’t able to see her for years. So, it was really tough.

One of the interesting things is something that I’m sure has changed. The only work duty that these women could do was to repair the uniforms from the male prisoners. They sewed buttons or knitted socks. That was their job. Which is a little bit sexist that they weren’t able to do other things.

When we packed up and got ready to leave we were saying goodbye to the women. This is my soft news person again, I started to cry.

The inmates said, “Why are you crying? You get to leave here. You know, we’re the ones that have to stay. Why are you upset?”

And I said, “Because I almost feel guilty.”

You know for me it was, “Oh look at Toni doing the bad girl thing for two or three days. And I get to hang out with you guys.”

I always knew in the back of my mind that I could leave in a few days. In some ways I almost felt as though I was taking advantage. Even though I thought I was sincere when I was leaving I had a real guilt about me.

ROB: The fact you were kind of coming in and do the report.

TONI: And then leaving again. But one of the women said, “Well, you are the first reporter who’s actually stayed here. Most just come in and do a quick interview and leave. At least you ate the food that we ate. You sat at the table with us. And you were as bored as we were for the last three days.”

That was really nice. They actually made me feel better, which is funny since I was the one getting out.

About six months later I was walking through a store in one of the malls. One of the women I met she was very funny. Very clean humor, just genuinely hilarious.

Walking through this store and all of a sudden I hear this voice. And I know right away it’s her. She was about fifty feet away from me. She says, “Gosh I haven’t seen you since we were in prison together.”

Everyone in the store just kind of stopped and looked at me and thought, “Oh my. I didn’t know Toni Marie was in prison.” But she did it for the comedic affect, it was funny.

This was a short part I ran out of time to play in that particular episode but I played on another show, her talking about St. John’s.

TONI: St. Johns has become very cosmopolitan. It’s not a large city by any stretch about 195,000 people. But there’s so much to do here. You can go any night of the week and see live music or a live theatrical performance.

We’ve got a beautiful new facility, called the Rooms. That houses the provincial art gallery, theater and archives. It’s fantastic.

I love St. Johns. I can walk by myself downtown at midnight and feel pretty safe.

I knew during one part of our chat, Toni would try to “turn the table” at one point. I steered it back to it being about her eventually. LOL.

TONI: But we should talk more about music, because you have a fantastic show, Salt Water Music. And I know that now it’s kind of the place to be for Newfoundland and Labrador and east coast artists to be played. Maybe I can kind of turn the table on you a little bit and ask if there’s anything maybe you want to know about some of your favorites or some of the people you’ve interviewed or played on your wonderful show?

ROB: You’ve done a lot of interviews with people, I’ve talked to like Ian Foster and Teresa Ennis.

TONI: Fergus O’Byrne too I believe.

ROB: Yeah. For Fergus you were partly responsible for that since we did the Newfoundland Herald interview then you were talking to Fergus during one of the weather hits.

You mentioned the interview and got my contact information and that’s how I got the interview with Fergus. So, thank you for that.

TONI: After I wrote that article a number of artists contacted me and wanted to know how to get in touch with you. Because you’re doing such a great service. Obviously every musician wants to have their music played on any radio station that will take them. But the unique thing about your program is that it possibly reaches a larger audience.

They get to play their music now for people who maybe hadn’t heard Teresa Ennis’s solo album since she was no longer with the Ennis sisters. Or maybe had never heard Fergus O’Byrne talk on the radio. Especially when you told me that wonderful story about your inspiration for Salt Water Music came from Ryan’s Fancy and from the death of Dermot O’Reilly.

Fergus will probably be one of the first to admit that their first stop in this country aside from Newfoundland was Ontario. Ryan’s Fancy did quite well there. It was great for Fergus knowing that there was somebody who was helping to keep great east coast music available to people in that part of the country.

ROB: Before we go, Toni, any favorite songs from Newfoundland artists that you’ve been listening to?

TONI: I think you know this but my boyfriend Kenny Butler is a musician. He does have a beautiful song and I believe you play it on your show.

It’s called Breathe the Air. It’s a beautiful song. And so, I’d love to hear that one.

There’s another one and it’s by Ron Hynes, which I’m sure everyone in your listening audience is familiar with.

The wonderful Ron Hynes, a man of a thousand songs. Years ago many people will remember the Ocean Ranger, which was an oil rig off the coast of Newfoundland that sank on one horrible night around Valentine’s Day.

He wrote a song about that disaster and about the people left behind. The song is called Atlantic Blue and it is one of the most beautiful songs I’ve ever heard. It’s so beautiful that I don’t think I’ve ever been able to listen to it and not cry. So, you could play that one for me too, if that’s okay.

[After playing those songs]

ROB: Your favorite song is one from the 80’s, is there a particular reason why that song became your favorite?

TONI: You’re talking about No One is to Blame, Howard Jones.

I think it’s just a very peaceful song that back in those days was around summer vacation. Probably came out when I was close to the end of high school. It’s just a very relaxing beautiful song.

And it talks about life too. No matter what happens, we can try not to hurt people but in the long run no one really is to blame for where their heart goes, where their heart leads them. I like that one.

ROB: I know you have a copy on vinyl.

TONI: I do. I wonder where I got that.

ROB: I don’t know.

TONI: Maybe a really good friend of mine in radio might have been able to track that one down for me.

ROB: Possibly.

TONI: Rob, thank you so much for inviting me on this show. I hope I haven’t bored you or your listeners too much. You’ve got such a fantastic show there, I’d hate to do anything to jeopardize it.

I want to thank you, not just for inviting me but for creating this wonderful show, Salt Water Music. I know that people not just in Newfoundland and Labrador appreciate that you’ve done this. But throughout the east coast of Canada, the artists who get to be played on this fantastic program.

I’m your numerous listeners love it too. And I know they appreciate that you’re bringing the east coast music back to Ontario.

ROB: I try my best. So, thanks for that. And thanks for joining us, Toni.

TONI: Thank you. You take care.

One last part was Toni’s story about saying Patrick Roy the wrong way on the radio. For this section if you see “Roy” it is the proper way to say it as in Patrick Roy. If you see “ROY” in caps it is ROY Rogers.

ROB: Since we’re on the radio what’s the first thing that comes to mind from doing radio?

TONI: I could tell you a really funny story, since you’re also involved in sports and I know you would appreciate this story quite a bit. I had been in radio for a while, I mostly was a DJ. I played music, did voice commercials and that sort of thing. Also I had written some news and a bit of sports. But I hadn’t done a lot of sports. Normally there’s a sports person.

This one summer someone from our sister station OZ FM went on vacation for an extended period. They needed someone to read news, sports and weather. Not being an avid sports watcher, I was not quite familiar with all of the names.

This one particular newscast I was reading, I came across the name Patrick Roy. I asked my producer the proper way to pronounce it. Now, I’d assumed it was Patrick Roy.

I said, “It’s Patrick Roy isn’t it?”

He says, “How’s the last name, spelled, Toni?”

“It’s spelled, R-o-y.”

My producer said, “Well, it sounds like ROY to me.”

“Are you sure?”

“Would I steer you wrong?”

“No, I’m sure you wouldn’t, Bill.”

We recorded three newscasts during each one I called Patrick Roy, Patrick ROY.

He knew the difference and was having some fun with me.

That probably happened about nineteen years ago. And I still have men who come up to me now, and ask me how Patrick ROY is doing.

The next day after work I was so embarrassed. Bill who’s a veteran of radio thought it was the funniest thing.

I guess OZ FM was kind of the cutting edge FM radio station at the time, and got away with a lot more than other radio stations would.

So management wasn’t upset with me they thought it was a little funny.

And kind of sweet, you know…. “Aw, the young girl.”

I asked Bill why he did that. And he said, “Well, they don’t say it’s Roy Rogers. They say, ROY Rogers.” Which really didn’t make it any better. 🙂

That ends the 2009 interview with Toni Marie. Since then Toni Marie and Kenny have had a daughter named Grace. Here is Toni and Grace from October 2012 promo for the Jamarama.

Obviously we’ll have new things to cover the next interview, being a mom being number 1. And she is the new anchor/host for NTV First Edition at 5:30pm local time in Newfoundland. To listen to the interview just click on either hour of that episode and you can download or stream it.

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Carnell Knowledge : Super Bowl 46 Edition

Super Bowl Edition of ‘Carnell Knowledge’. Is that a pun? It’s what I call the NFL picks during the regular season.  A listener once came up with that title so credit to Cat in Connecticut.

Sports is international. On Thursday night during the Queen’s-RMC hockey broadcast we found out from Queen’s Athletics there was a listener online in New Zealand of all places. Where it would’ve been Friday morning with the time difference. Like me watching the Australian Open at 3:30am. Which since I’m on midnight shift isn’t that unique.

Done this blog post for the last couple of years. Just me doing a Super Bowl pick by myself would be boring. So get others to give some as well.

Before we start, a video from Gillette Stadium in the cheap seats when a certain Ravens kicker missed a field goal in the AFC Championship. They are slightly excited. Gives a good idea what it’s like during an NFL playoff game.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pC5EG-RQVxM

Before we go to the picks I will go back to the January 16th blog post. I wrote what the Super Bowl storylines might be before the NFC and AFC championship games were played. Decided to mention something about Tom Brady.

https://saltwatermusic.wordpress.com/2012/01/16/early-superbowl-storylines/

“And your little known fact, Brady was drafted by the Montreal Expos in 1995. As a catcher. Witness to ‘The Catch’ and could’ve been a catcher. Maybe someone else will pick up on that if there is a 49ers-Pats Super Bowl.”

Well, San Francisco didn’t make it. But according to Google, Tom Brady and the word “Expos” appear in over 300 news articles earlier this week. Many linking to this Globe and Mail story.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/football/tom-brady-a-montreal-expo-what-might-have-been/article2321800/

Amusing when I predicted a story almost 3 weeks ago. Super Bowl week tends to do that since most players have their talking points for any questions that arise. No one wants to give Bulletin Board material so the media is stuck. Luckily the Colts and Peyton Manning soap opera has given them plenty to talk about.

Onto the picks.

First up 2 people who have helped out each year. Andrew Bucholtz who runs Yahoo Canada’s CFL blog ’55 Yard Line’. Queen’s Alumni who worked at the Queen’s Journal.

https://twitter.com/#!/AndrewBucholtz

“I’ve got Giants 24, Patriots 21.”

Jody Vance, from Breakfast Television in Vancouver. Also helps out with Sportsnet, like the CONCACAF Women’s Olympic Qualifying Tournament last week. She picked Giants over Patriots in a newspaper column in 2007 before they played in that Super Bowl. This time she’s going with the Patriots.

https://twitter.com/#!/jodyvance

Julie Stewart-Binks, sports anchor at CTV Regina. Former intermission reporter at CFRC.  Might’ve seen her on TVCogeco during Frontenac games as well.

https://twitter.com/#!/JSB_CTV

“24-20 Patriots”

Matt Bisson from CHED Edmonton and former play by play of Golden Gaels Football at CFRC.

https://twitter.com/#!/Matt_Bisson

“My heart says New England, but my head says the Giants momentum is too strong, and they will lift the trophy.”

Chris Lund. Writer-at-large. Work for theScore, write for Hardball Times, founded AlwaysOUA. Interned at The Hockey News.

https://twitter.com/#!/THEChrisLund

“I like NYG. Say 30-22.”

Jaime Stein, who is leaving his position as the CFL’s Manager of Digital Media. Former sports host/play by play here at CFRC.

https://twitter.com/#!/jaimestein

“I’ll go with New England.”

Jaime wrote a blog about his time with the CFL, worth checking out.

http://jaimestein.wordpress.com/

Steve Maich, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Sportsnet Magazine. Who I didn’t know was a CFRC Alumni until we were chatting on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/#!/stevemaich

“Giants 24, Patriots 20”

You can read a few articles from past issues of Sportsnet Magazine here. Long form articles on Gordie Howe, the decline of the Montreal Canadiens and the late Sarah Burke. Picked up a few issues and worth a read if you are a sports fan. Especially if you are at work during a slow time and it’s 4am. Which is probably nobody reading this except me.

http://www.sportsnet.ca/magazine/news/archive/

Next two from a couple of women who aren’t football fans. Nancy Slater, Midday announcer on Classic Rock FM96 in Kingston. She’s on the air from 10am-3pm. Nancy plays some Open Mics around town and put up a few songs on YouTube you can check out.

https://twitter.com/#!/SlaterFM96

http://www.youtube.com/user/nanunt13

“I like cheering for the underdogs, so I’ll go with the Giants. Fingers crossed for the upset.”

BJ Stewart, producer from The Weather Network’s morning show. Tweets during the show and posts on Facebook as well. One of the multi-taskers. She likes hockey, not into football. Still got a pick, which was I believe mostly based on their uniforms. Whatever works.

https://twitter.com/#!/@TWN_AM_SHOW

https://www.facebook.com/pages/TWN-AM-SHOW/108169452608807

“Go Patriots! 🙂 ”

Natalie Thomas from The Weather Network, who beat me last year in NHL Playoff Picks here on the blog. However we did both pick Boston to beat Vancouver. On the sports side she played US College Basketball for Appalachain State. And recently playing basketball got her 1st technical foul ever….. for calling a timeout when the team didn’t have one. Still counts as a technical. [EDIT: Forgot to mention her team still won the game when her sister scored, so it’s not a Chris Webber situation]

https://twitter.com/#!/NatalieTWN

http://nataliethomas.ca/

“I am taking the Giants solely because I am in NYC all next week. So if there’s a Super Bowl champions parade…I’ll get to be there for it!”

Out to St. John’s, Newfoundland with Kevin Kelly. Senior Editor of The Newfoundland Herald, Host ‘On The Scene’ on OZ FM’s Jigs & Reels. And a Habs fan but I don’t hold that against him.

https://twitter.com/#!/KKellyNFHerald

“Patriots 21-17.”

From East Coast to West Coast with Amar, a video editor in Vancouver. Who realized there wasn’t a great choice either way as a Canucks fan. He mentioned last year Stanley Cup Final which would’ve leaned him towards NY. Until I said “I know you are picking the home of the 1994 Stanley Cup, New York”. Stuck between a rock and a hard place.

https://twitter.com/#!/AmarTime

http://www.youtube.com/amarvision

“I’m picking Mr. Gisele’s team then.”

One of the more well known CFRC Alumni Chris Cuthbert helped out too. Chris started out doing play-by-play for Queen’s Football as a university student. Today he’s at TSN/CTV doing CFL and NHL games. Called the last few Grey Cups. Also part of a sports blog that started a few months ago.

http://www.goldengoalsportsblog.com/

https://twitter.com/#!/CCtsn

“Not my area of expertise but I’ll take Brady and the Patriots. #revenge”

For me, this one can go either way after looking at the games they played 2 weeks ago. Patriots had a bad performance from Brady where he himself said “I sucked”. Giants’ offense had a stretch of 11 possessions with 10 punts against the 49ers.  Yet, both of those teams are in Indy.

One of the stranger facts from this season. My team the Redskins who finished 5-11 beat the New York Giants, TWICE. Patriots played Washington this year and New England won. If they couldn’t beat Rex Grossman I can’t pick them to beat Tom Brady.

Patriots 32-24

Not everyone will be watching the game, while Jody will be watching the game another of BT Vancouver gang will be busy. Dawn Chubai is doing a concert on Sunday afternoon. Jazz singer before getting into television, where she’s on BT Vancouver.  Never hurts to give a plug.

http://yfrog.com/user/dawn_chubai/photos

https://twitter.com/#!/dawn_chubai

Jazz Vespers, Dawn Chubai Quartet: St. Andrew Wesley Church at 4:00pm

Back to the opposite coast as my friend Toni Marie Wiseman doesn’t like football either, but the Super Bowl is on NTV so that means she gets off work early. If it’s like past years she should be doing some news updates during the time they air the long NBC pre-game show. No 6pm news in St. John’s this Sunday.

https://twitter.com/#!/FayeGrim

Like others in this blog she’s more busy than me. ‘NTV news anchor, entertainment reporter, and senior weather host. I’m also a new mom.’

Kickoff for the game is 6:30pm EST on NBC and CTV.  Or you might watch it through ‘other means’ as Brady was quoted; “Last year, I was rehabbing my foot in Costa Rica watching the game on an illegal Super Bowl website and now I’m actually playing in the game, so it’s pretty cool”.

I’ll be watching the game on TV, first time I’ll see it from start to finish in 3 years.  With my weird work hours the last three I’ve woken up and watched the 2nd half.  Which honestly has worked well.  This time I thought I’ll see the entire thing.  Not the pre-game shows.  Even I draw the line with those. Longest is NFL Network’s 8 1/2 hour one.  I wish that was a typo.

Enjoy the game if you are watching it.

August Update

Just realized no updates on the blog since July.  Summer flying by.

Since I haven’t been on air since it happened, a quick congratulations to Toni Marie Wiseman and Kenny Butler on the birth of their daughter Grace.  She was born on Saturday August 7 at 12:20am. Weighed 8lbs 2 ounces and has a full head of brown hair.  I interviewed Toni Marie last July so a lot has changed in a year.  If you are a viewer of NTV it will be a few more months till you see her back on TV.

Last week the show was a rerun while I was in Toronto and that’s also the plan for this Friday.  Get a bit of a break for yours truly as September is when things ramp up at the station.

Queen’s Football back on CFRC and earlier than usual. With the Waterloo Warriors steroid scandal and subsequent canceling of their football season that caused some scheduling headaches.  After all was said and done Queen’s will open up the season on Tuesday night, August 31st.  Road game in Hamilton against MacMaster.  Originally I mentioned on the show it was a Sept. 1st afternoon game but that got pushed up a day.

Each OUA team gets a Bye Week this season.  The Golden Gaels get Labour Day off.  First home game is a Sunday, keep that in mind if you want to go or listen on the radio.  After that we are back to the usual Saturday at 1pm starts for the rest of the year.

Tue. 8/31/2010
7:00 pm McMaster University

Mon. 9/6/2010 BYE WEEK

Sun. 9/12/2010
1:00 pm University of Windsor HOME GAME

Sat. 9/18/2010
1:00 pm University of Guelph

Sat. 9/25/2010
1:00 pm University of Ottawa HOME GAME

Sat. 10/2/2010
1:00 pm Western

Sat. 10/9/2010
1:00 pm University of Toronto HOME GAME

Sat. 10/16/2010
1:00 pm Wilfrid Laurier

Sat. 10/23/2010
1:00 pm York University HOME GAME

After working on every football broadcast over 4 seasons I’ll be reducing my work load.  Taking some games off this year.  Think I’ll finally have a chance to see the team play at the stadium. When you are the one at the station for 4 years during games, that pretty much eliminates a chance to witness a game in person.

April 16th and 23rd Episodes

Catching up with the last 2 episodes, lots of new music on these ones.  People still finding the blog from looking up news on Toni Marie in the last week.  Maybe people visiting St. John’s for the Junos and catching her on the news.  She’s on vacation this week for those wondering where she is on the news.

Bruins pulled off an upset, I picked Buffalo in 7.  Glad Boston won.  If you’re wondering Bruins-Habs can’t happen till the Conference finals.  Boston gets either the Flyers or Penguins in Round 2.  Either way not much traveling for the Bruins.  Both teams in Pennsylvania.

Back to the music.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicApril16th2010Hour1

Joel Plaskett solo CD from a few years back before he opened for Barenaked Ladies that Tuesday in Kingston.

More music from Price Edward Island. First time on the show for The Danks, Carmen Townshend, The Cashmere Disciples and Racoon Bandit. Meaghan Blanchard to end the first hour.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicApril16th2010Hour2

Open up with a band from PEI, Haunted Hearts. Instrumental track called “The GST Cheques are here” which I had to play just for the title.

Followed by Juno nominee, and eventual winner Amelia Curran from Newfoundland. Stay with the Rock with Chris Picco.

End the show with Nathan Wiley, an unreleased Hey Rosetta! song and Teresa Ennis.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicApril23rd2010Hour1

Open the show with brand the new CD from Air Traffic Control. Then back to the mid 90’s with a Greg Keelor solo effort. More new music to end the first hour with a duo from out east called Lazy Bones. Couple of tracks from Allison Crowe too.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicApril23rd2010Hour2

Allison Crowe to start the hour then back to a Joel Plaskett CD from a few years back. New music from a female duo, Madison Violet along with some blues from New Brunswick with Ross Neilsen. End the show with Hey Rosetta! who are in the midst of putting together a new album.

Congratulations to Toni Marie and Kenny/ECMA’s

First off, some great news from Sunday. Really tired during the weekend so woke up after a few hours sleep to watch NTV Sunday Evening Newshour. Those who saw it know why I tuned in.

Congratulations to Toni Marie Wiseman and Kenny Butler as they’re expecting a baby girl in July. I can now say I’ve known for a while.  I didn’t say anything on the radio or blog out of respect of her wishes. Toni wanted to keep it quiet till she was a few months along and things were going smoothly. She joked about having her first child later than most and Larry said “25?”. That was funny. At the end he said something along the lines of “goodnight from me and them” pointing to Toni Marie. That is correct now.

I did find out something new last night. I didn’t know if it was a boy or a girl. Now I do. Great news for both of them.  Known Toni Marie for years so I can attest how thrilled she is.  Kenny is extremely happy as well and looking forward to July.  Congrats again to them.

Onto the ECMA’s. After my lack of sleep and catching Toni talk about the good news I crashed and fell asleep. Combine that with working Sunday night and I missed the awards. Not archived yet but I read it will be. By all accounts it was a LONG show. Kevin Kelly of the Newfoundland Herald on Facebook said it was 4 hours and 17 minutes! Couldn’t show that much on TV. Although Patrick Molloy on Facebook also said that almost half of the crowd had left by the end of it. That’s a long haul for anyone. Lots of music from the reports. 4 hours is a marathon especially since most of the crowd has probably seen other musicians during the previous few days.

Still wish it had some TV exposure this year. Only big East Coast fans would’ve found it online. Not even mentioning the scheduling against the Oscars. That was bad timing. ECMA’s scheduled it before the Oscars released their date so I can’t complain about that. Oscars are same town, same theatre every year. So they don’t need to plan that far ahead. For instance there is no date for the 2011 Oscars. ECMA’s just got hit with some bad luck this year. Next year Charlottetown hosts the awards, but in April. On one hand it is hard for people to travel to these things in February/March. April does raise other problems as acts are starting to tour across the country with the nicer weather. We’ll see how the change affects things. That month is also when CBC gets taken over by NHL Playoffs. So not sure if the TV situation will get better next year.

Onto the awards. First industry night on Friday. Reports today saying Joel Plaskett won 6 ECMA awards this weekend. Wrong. He won 1 on Friday along with 6 on Sunday, so that’s 7.


Broadcast of the Year presented by Atlantic Tractors : Atlantic Airwaves

Event of the Year presented by Cape Breton University: Halifax Pop Explosion

Independent Company of the Year presented by Sampson McDougall : Sonic Entertainment Group

Industry Professional of the Year presented by CARAS : Darren Gallop

Manager of the Year presented by Gillis Home Building Centre : Heather Gibson

Media Person of the Year presented by Tim Hortons : Doug Gallant

Producer of the Year by Shure : Joel Plaskett

Record Company/Distributor/Independent Label of the Year : Sonic Records

Studio of the Year presented by Bay Music : The Sonic Temple

Studio Engineer of the Year sponsored by OIART (Ont. Institute of Audio Recording Technology) : Mike “Sheppy” Shelfpherd

Venue of the Year presented by Casino Nova Scotia : The Company House

Visual Artist of the Year presented by Marcato Digital Solutions : Chr!s Sm!th

Stompin’ Tom Award presented by Jim Sampson Motors : Billy and Cornelia MacLeod

FACTOR Industry Builder Award : Stephen “Beak” MacDonald

Musician’s Achievement Award : Dave McKeough

Atlantic Lottery Volunteer of the Year Award : Marie Doyle and Margie MacNeil

Onto Sunday night’s awards. Where Joel cleaned up. Other artists I’ve played on the show.

Entertainer of the Year: Joel Plaskett.

Female Solo Recording of the Year: Catherine MacLellan – “Water In The Ground.”

Group Recording of the Year: In-Flight Safety – “We Are an Empire, My Dear”

Male Solo Recording of the Year: Joel Plaskett – “Three”

Recording of the Year: Joel Plaskett – “Three”

Rising Star Recording of the Year: Kim Wempe – “Where I Need To Be”

Single of the Year: Joel Plaskett – “Through & Through & Through”

Songwriter of the Year: Joel Plaskett – “Through & Through & Through”

Video of the Year: The Tom Fun Orchestra – “Throw Me to the Rats”

Aboriginal Recording of the Year: Forever – “Reborn”

Alternative Recording of the Year: In-Flight Safety – “We Are an Empire, My Dear”

Bluegrass Recording of the Year: The Grass Mountain Hobos – “ZOOT!”

Blues Recording of the Year: The Hupman Brothers – “Countin’ Quarters”

Country Recording of the Year: The Divorcees – “Last of the Free Men”

Folk Recording of the Year: Catherine MacLellan – “Water In The Ground”

Francophone Recording of the Year: BLOU – “Noel Blou”

Gospel Recording of the Year: The Ascensions – “No Greater Love”

Instrumental Recording of the Year: Andrea Beaton – “Branches”

Jazz Recording of the Year: Gypsophilia – “Sa-ba-da-OW!”

Loud Recording of the Year: The Motorleague – “Black Noise”

Pop Recording of the Year: Joel Plaskett – “Three”

Rap/Hip-Hop Single Track Recording of the Year: Classified – “Anybody Listening”

Rock Recording of the Year: The Novaks – “Things Fall Apart”

Roots/Traditional Solo Recording of the Year: Lennie Gallant – “If We Had a Fire”

Roots /Traditional Group Recording of the Year: Dawn and Margie Beaton – “Taste of Gaelic”

R&B/Soul Single Track Recoding of the Year: Jamie Sparks – “All I Need – Remix”

Fan’s Choice Video of the Year: The Motorleague – “Hymn For The Newly Departed”

Fan’s Choice Artist/Group of the Year: Samantha Robichaud

Director’s Special Achievement Award: The Rankin Family

Dr. Helen Creighton Lifetime Achievement Award: Scotty Turner

Last thing for today is I’m going to interview Con O’Brien from The Irish Descendants tomorrow morning. If everything falls into place. They play Kingston a week from Tuesday.

Super Bowl Blog

I’d add a bunch of my own words but there’s not much need. I said here and on air, my grandmother has lived in Louisiana since the early 70’s.  You know I’m cheering for the Saints.  I’m picking them to win as well.
As of Saturday morning, 2 people both in British Columbia gave me their opinion.  First up Andrew Bucholtz who went to Queen’s.  He has a sports blog at the following address.

http://www.sportingmadness.ca/

This year’s Super Bowl is an interesting clash in styles between the pass-heavy Colts’ offence (second in the league in passing yardage during the regular season, 32nd in rushing yardage) and the balanced Saints’ offence (fourth in passing yardage and sixth in rushing yardage).
For the Colts, Peyton Manning is playing at an incredible level despite an inexperienced cast of wide receivers, but the question is if that will be enough to overcome their lack of a rushing game. The Saints have a tremendous amount of offensive weapons, including Pierre Thomas, Reggie Bush, Devery Henderson and Robert Meachem, and their offence can be the most explosive in the league when it’s in gear, but it’s looked downright mediocre at times. One of those times came in the waning stages of the NFC Championship game against the Vikings, a game they might well have lost in regulation if not for a stupid 12-men-in-the-huddle penalty on Minnesota that set up an ill-advised Brett Favre throw and a crucial interception. Which version of the Saints’ offence shows up will go a long way towards deciding this one. Both defences are pretty even statistically, and neither is elite, but the Colts specialize in a conservative scheme that prevents big plays by the offence and the Saints prefer to gamble in the hopes of making big plays defensively.

The game could go either way, but I think the Saints’ balanced attack and playmaking defence will be enough to put them over the top.
Prediction: Saints 35, Colts 31

Joining Andrew is someone who didn’t go to Queen’s. But her husband Bart did join us on CFRC as a guest on ‘Offsides’ twice in 2009.  Jody Vance who is on the radio with Shore 104 in Vancouver these days.  Formerly of Sportsnet and LeafsTV.  She would’ve written more but she’s quite busy right now.  Her day job at the station, along with her young son Brady, starting a new daily show/segment called BC Barometer on Monday…. oh and that Winter Olympic thing that’s coming up.

http://www.shore104.com

When she had a weekly column in a Toronto newspaper a couple of Super Bowls ago she predicted Giants over Patriots in writing.  Lots of bragging rights with that one.
Jody’s short but sweet prediction for us?

“Peyton all the way.”

She was pulling for Brett Favre, though. That didn’t end well to say the least. lol.

To wrap it up some East Coast content.  Not confirmed but usually my friend Toni Marie does news updates during Super Bowl Sunday on NTV in St. John’s.  She’s not a football fan so doesn’t mind. Some people don’t watch the Super Bowl.  Rare but she’s one of them, ha ha.

They’re recovering from their snow storm.  On Facebook last night she said she can’t see her vehicle and that the snow is above her front door. Isn’t that nice?  And by the way this is her real account.

http://www.facebook.com/tmwiseman

Someone wasn’t convinced last night because Toni was up late when she posted…… yes TV people can’t stay up late on a day off. Sheesh.

Links to all interviews from 2009

Time for a blog entry with all the interviews from 2009.  One of those things where I knew there was a few but once I added them up it got to be a longer list than I though. [Added Allison Crowe which got lost in all the copy and paste I was doing]

Thanks to all those who gave time to be interviewed for the show in 2009. Time to go “Romper Room” and say thanks to Sora, Fergus, Ray, Andrea, Melanie, Tim, Melissa, Bryan, Ian, Toni Marie, Robin, Allison, Neate, Laurie, Gerry and Kirsten.  Whew.  Close to 18 hours of radio here so many weeks worth of listening if you missed some of them.

Sora on her latest CD and her music for this episode.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicFeb20th2009SoraInterview

Fergus O’Byrne from the legendary Newfoundland group Ryan’s Fancy joins the show.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicMar6th2009Hour1

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicMar6th2009Hour2

Ray Johnson from Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers before their tour stop in Kingston.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicMarch13th2009Hour2

Andrea Wittgens, the first Queen’s graduate to join the show.  Originally from Antigonish, NS and currently living in Seattle.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicMar20th2009Hour1

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicMar20th2009Hour2

Melanie Samson a singer/songwriter from Newfoundland who sings in English and French.  And she’s also a schoolteacher and we discuss that and her experience at the ECMA’s.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicMarch27th2009Hour1

Tim Baker from Hey Rosetta! in an interview where he was walking around Toronto on a day off on his cellphone.  Put together at the last minute before they came to Kingston last spring but it worked out well.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicApril17th2009Hour1

Melissa DiMarco from Out There before an episode where she visited Nova Scotia.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicMay1st2009Hour1

Bryan Page from Faded Blue on the 2 year anniversary show of the radio show.  Interview was done live during the show as opposed to the usual taped scenario.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicMay15th2009Hour1

Ian Foster joined the program for the 3rd time before his 2009 tour.  This time he drove from Newfoundland to Ontario, then flew to British Columbia for some dates.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicJuly3rd2009Hour1IanFoster

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicJuly3rd2009Hour2IanFoster

Toni-Marie Wiseman from NTV who interviewed me for the Newfoundland Herald and helped get the Fergus O’Byrne interview.  We talk about how she started out in radio and then moved to TV.  Cover a lot of topics including her favorite songs.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicJuly10th2009Hour1

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicJuly10th2009Hour2

Allison Crowe and her music for 2 hours.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicSept25th2009AllisonCrowe

Neate Sager on the Queen’s Golden Gaels Vanier Cup run.

http://www.archive.org/details/CfrcInterviewWithNeateSagerDec2nd2009

Robin Meade from HLN’s Morning Express joined the show during her book tour.  Day we taped it she was doing a book signing that night in her native Ohio.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicOct9th2009Hour2

Two Olympic torchbearers from the Kingston area, Laurie Walker and Rev. Gerry Moore. Then with Kirsten Mihailides from the Coca-Cola side of the Torch relay organizers.

http://www.archive.org/details/SaltWaterMusicDec11thHour2

Thanks again to all those who joined the show during 2009.  Going to be hard to top that list of guests in 2010, but I’ll see who I can bring to the airwaves.

Queen’s Hockey tonight at 7:30pm against RMC.  Friday the show will be a bit shorter due to another hockey game at 7:30pm followed by Queen’s Basketball Saturday at 8pm.  Busy week of University sports on the station.